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Swiss Scholar Dedicates Life to Bali
Posted on 2002/3/1 22:43:02 ( 662 reads )


Source: Jarkata Post





BALI, INDONESIA, February 22, 2002: A new book on Bali entitled "Bali Living in Two Worlds," was launched on February 21. The book was written by a group of aspiring Balinese writers, an architect, activists and others who are directly witnessing the rapid changes in Bali. Although 13 people contributed to the book, it would not have come about without the efforts of Swiss anthropologist and scholar Urs Ramseyer. The book is a comprehensive mosaic of current Balinese society, said Ramseyer. Since his first visit to Bali in 1972, Ramseyer has visited Bali almost every year to study and help preserve its music, dance and culture. Ramseyer produced a video on the process of weaving a sacred Penggringsingan cloth used for religious functions. Only a few Tenganan people are still capable of making this cloth which takes between five to eight years to weave. The documentary was made due to concern that the tradition would be forgotten if the younger generation of Tenganan were no longer able to acquire the weaving skill from their parents. One of Ramseyer's other legacies is the establishment of Sidemen high school in Sidemen village in 1987. Most youth in remote villages went to city centers to find schools and work in tourist centers. The villages were left empty. Unlike public schools in Bali the Sidemen school set up its own curriculum that includes cultural studies such as lontar (palm leaf inscriptions) reading, dancing, singing and gamelan music lessons. The school also gives its students knowledge of traditional medicine and other traditions.




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Swami Parthasarathy's Message in Malaysia
Posted on 2002/3/1 22:42:02 ( 604 reads )


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KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA, February 25, 2002: Speaking to about 350 people at the Lakshimi Narayan Temple at Jalan Ipoh yesterday, Swami Parthasarathy said, "All actions by the individual are their own creation. It's you who impose duties and responsibilities upon yourself and you are the ultimate master of yourself." In his talk titled "We Live By choice, Not by Chance," he added, "You cannot be a good manager if you cannot manage yourself. Self-management revolves around controlling the mind and the intellect." The management guru from Mumbai is renowned for conducting The Power of Self management seminars in the United States, Europe, Australia and India. Swami Parthasarathy said, "Your mind can cause damage. If your intellect does not direct it properly, then you may make a wrong decision. Everyone's mind is pressured by desire and expectations in the world." "Pave your way in life through individual reflection and understanding. by such continuous striving, on manifold aspects of life, you develop a powerful intellect," said the swami who spoke about higher values of peace and prosperity. He added that in life it was important that one did not choose a vocation alien to one's basic nature. "If you do, you will then become mentally agitated and as a result your productivity will fail. You will not progress in life and build stress upon yourself. Unresolved, stress can lead to ill health, high blood pressure, heart disease and many other chronic problems."




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India Death Toll Rises in Religious Rioting
Posted on 2002/2/28 22:49:02 ( 578 reads )


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AHMADABAD, INDIA, March 1, 2002: Chaos spread through this western Indian city Friday and the death toll over three days of Hindu-Muslim violence climbed to 251, despite patrols by hundreds of soldiers and orders for police to shoot rioters and arsonists on sight. In the worst attack, hundreds of Hindus set fire to huts in a Muslim shantytown, killing 52 people as they slept, police said. After 27 charred bodies were pulled from the ashes, an additional 25 people died in the hospital; officials said 17 were being treated for serious burns. The Hindu attacks are revenge for a Muslim attack on a train Wednesday, in which 58 people died, mostly Hindus. Gangs of Hindus blockaded roads, searched cars for Muslims and set fire to shops and homes, continuing the rampages of the day before. Victims slain Thursday lay where they fell through the night, with guns firing, fires burning and chilling mob war cries. After dawn, survivors ventured out to collect their dead and seek treatment for their wounds. People streamed into hospitals, mostly for treatment of stab wounds, but also for safety. Police opened fire at Muslims and Hindus who were tossing bombs at each other near a mosque in the suburb of Bapunagar, said Deputy Police Commissioner R.J. Savani. He said six were killed and 70 were hospitalized, but gave no further details. "All through Thursday we were busy trying to protect the Muslims from attacks from Hindus, but since this morning the retaliation has started,'' Savani said. "It has now turned to group clashes." The fiery train attack in the small town of Godhra killed 58, including 14 children; 42 others were injured, including 20 hospitalized for burns or smoke inhalation. Police said 63 people had been arrested on charges of murder and attempted murder in the train attack. The Hindu groups said that action was not enough, and called for a nationwide strike on Friday, but that did not materialize. There was little evidence of the strike or violence elsewhere, including the national capital of New Delhi, although police were out in force. Despite curfews in 36 towns in Gujarat state, there was no let up in arson, looting and assaults, prompting Muslim groups to call for direct federal rule in the state. Most of the Muslims in the shantytown of Narora, on the outskirts of Ahmadabad, had fled Thursday, fearing they would be targets of the Hindus roaming the city as police watched, unwilling or unable to stop them. But the fire sparked at 2:00 a.m. trapped sleeping shanty dwellers who stayed behind, said Deputy Police Commissioner P.B. Gondya. Seven women and eight children were among the bodies recovered. In Thursday's worst violence, 2,000 Hindus set fire to six homes in an affluent Muslim neighborhood in Ahmadabad. At least 38 people burned to death, including 12 children. Hundreds of Muslim homes, stores, hotels, and restaurants were torched or looted by the attackers. "Police can't protect each lane and bylane," said Police Commissioner P.C. Pandey, responding to criticism that thousands of police watched silently as Hindus targeted Muslims. Tensions have been growing between Muslims and Hindu nationalists who have been traveling across Gujarat by train to Ayodhya, in northern India, where the Vishwa Hindu Parishad plans to start constructing a temple next month at the birthplace of Lord Rama.




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Hand-Woven Khadi Fabrics Go High Fashion
Posted on 2002/2/28 22:48:02 ( 705 reads )


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KOLKATA, INDIA, FEBRUARY 18, 2002: From Tuesday onwards one can buy a khadi shirt or a dress that has been tailor-made by an international designers such as Rohit Bal and Malini Romani, at the Khadi Gramodyog Bhavan in Kolkata. Khadi is the traditional hand-spun and hand-woven cotton fabric promoted by Mahatma Gandhi. This is Khadi Village Industries Commission's (KVIC) first step to bring top dress designers for the special fashion counters that are going to open up in the main khadi stores in every state. Kolkata is the second city where such a fashion counter will open after the first was introduced in New Delhi about three weeks ago, informed the assistant director of KVIC, Kamal Chkraborty. He added that a decision was made about three months ago to spruce up the main khadi stores in every state by "going designer." Designer salwar-kurta, ladies tops, gents shirts and kurtas all made out of cotton khadi, will be available at the fashion counters.




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Japan Team Visits Udupi Ayurveda college
Posted on 2002/2/28 22:47:02 ( 575 reads )


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UDUPI, INDIA, February 19, 2002: Ayurveda is the best medicine system for mental health and this will be proved beyond doubt in the twenty-first century, argued Dr. Ben Hatai, Chairman of Japanese Society for Ayurveda. He was addressing a press meet at Dharmasthala Manjunatheshwara Ayurveda College, Kuthpady, near here on Monday. He is here with a delegation of 15 Japanese doctors to learn the panchakarma ayurvedic procedure and eye related treatments. He said ayurvedic researches are going on in Japan for the last 30 years and added that there is ample evidence to prove that ayurveda medical system existed in Japan in the seventh century. He claimed that he was the first government licensed Ayurveda practitioner in Japan and is founder of the Institute of Traditional Oriental Medicine. The tridosha diagnosing system is catching on in Japan, he added. He announced that his institute has signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Gujrat Ayurveda University for technical consultancy in preparing Ayurvedic medicines.




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Writer Sought for Article on Hindu Attitudes Toward Animals
Posted on 2002/2/28 22:46:02 ( 606 reads )


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OXFORD, ENGLAND, March 1, 2002: Professor Andrew Linzey of the Faculty of Theology, University of Oxford, writes that he is "looking for a scholarly writer who could contribute an article (around 800 words) on Hindu Attitudes to Animals for the Animal World Encyclopedia which I am editing for Kingsley Publishing." Persons interested may e-mail him at "source" above.




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Ravi Shankar Wins World Music Grammy
Posted on 2002/2/28 22:45:02 ( 622 reads )


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LOS ANGELES, USA, February 27, 2002: Legendary Indian sitar player and composer Ravi Shankar won one of music's highest awards, a Grammy, for his achievements in world music. Shankar was honored for his album "Full Circle/Carnegie Hall 2000" in the category in which he competed against artists such as Brazil's Gilberto Gil and Milton Nascimento and Britain's John McLaughlin for "Saturday Night In Bombay -- Remember Shakti." Shankar also saw off competition from Afro Celt Sound System for "Further In Time" in the category which recognizes traditional music.




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Karnataka State Shelves Plan for 300 English Medium Schools
Posted on 2002/2/28 22:44:02 ( 630 reads )


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BANGALORE, INDIA, February 12, 2002: Following protests from various quarters against the education department's decision to allow setting up of about 300 English medium schools in the state, chief minister S M Krishna postponed the move announced recently because it was contrary to the state's three-language formula -- Kannada, Hindi and, most commonly, English.




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Puerto Rico's Self Realization Fellowship Open House
Posted on 2002/2/28 22:43:02 ( 1229 reads )


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PUERTO RICO, March 1, 2002: Among a few Hindu or Hindu-based organizations in the territory of the US is the Self Realization Fellowship. They have an open house scheduled at their San Juan Center on Sunday May 19 at noon. Retreats are held the first weekend of the month. The purpose of the open houses are to welcome new comers and give them a sense of the history and teachings of Paramahansa Yogananda and SRF. The Puerto Rican center of SRF at San Juan was established in the early 1950s. It is coordinated by a managing council under the direction of monastics from the international head quarters of SRF in Los Angeles, an international nonprofit organization founded in 1920 by Paramahamsa Yogananda to introduce people of all races, cultures and creeds the ancient science and philosophy of yoga and its time honored methods of meditation. Puerto Rico has a Satya Sai Mandir, a Vedanta Society, a number of yoga teachers, an ayurvedic shop and several vegetarian restaurants.




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Help Update the Hindu Megatrends
Posted on 2002/2/24 22:49:02 ( 674 reads )


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KAUAI, HAWAII, February 25, 2002: In 1989, Hinduism Today published a list of ten "Hindu Megatrends." "Megatrends" is a term coined by futurologist John Naisbett in 1982 to name the major underlying forces that are transforming society and shaping the future. To formulate our ten Hindu megatrends more than a decade ago, we solicited the advice of prominent Hindu religious leaders, scholars, priest and business people. Now we'd like your input to update the list. To give you an idea of the list, here's the first trend, "Hindu Meekness to Hindu Pride: Though Swami Vivekananda began this trend a hundred years ago, even up to recent times Hindus were afraid to identify themselves as Hindus, or as members of a particular Hindu sect. Through the effort of many people and organizations, Hindu pride and self-confidence have replaced the self-doubt and timidness instilled during centuries of foreign rule. Native dress becomes fashionable." The remaining trends are: 2. Village to Global Awareness; 3. East Only to East and West; 4. Men Only to Men and Women; 5. Temple Decline to Temple Revival; 6. Introverted to Extroverted; 7. Limited Tools to Great Resources: 8. Colony to Superpower; 9. Agricultural to Technological: 10. Major Blows to Fewer Setbacks. Click on "source" above to go to the complete list and description, and e-mail your comments, suggestions and revisions to megatrends@hindu.org.




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Government to Open Ayurveda Research Center in Moscow
Posted on 2002/2/24 22:48:02 ( 717 reads )


Source: The Hindu





KOTTAKKAL, INDIA, FEBRUARY 23, 2002: The government will soon open an ayurveda research center in Moscow as part of a package of programs being drawn up to preserve and promote ayurveda, the Union Minister for Human Resource Development and Science and Technology, Murli Manohar Joshi, said while inaugurating the centenary celebrations of Vaidyaratnam PS Varier Arya Vaidyasala. In his speech, Prof. Joshi expressed the hope that ayurvedic physicians would participate in such programs and hone their medical and computer skills to reap the benefits of the growing interest throughout the world in ayurveda. Dr. Joshi also said that learning of Sanskrit was central to practicing ayurveda and said he had set up a cell in his ministry to compile information of ayurvedic herbs which was necessary to safeguard their patents from being usurped by foreign drug companies. A compact disc had also been prepared by the National Chemical Laboratory in Pune to preserve traditional knowledge in modern electronic format. The minister called for efforts to exploit the growing global herbal market and wanted ayurvedic institutes to promote cultivation of medicinal plants in their neighborhood as a means of supplementing income of farmers.




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Elephant Race Held at Guruvayur Temple
Posted on 2002/2/24 22:47:02 ( 714 reads )


Source: The Hindu





THRISSUR, INDIA, February 25, 2002: Out of a total of 40 of the 58 elephants of the Guruvayur Devaswom-run elephant shelter paraded before the Manjulal premises for the race, only seven elephants were allowed to run. The 39-year-old tusker, Kannan, emerged winner for the seventh time at the famous "anayottam" (elephant race) at the Guruvayur Sree Krishna Temple. It is the seventh time that Kannan won. The seven elephants which participated in the race were received with blowing of the conch and "nirapara" at the front of the temple. There was a huge crowd on the temple premises to watch the race. The veterinarians, K. C. Panickar, Muraleedharan Nair, and ayurveda expert dealing with elephants, Avaniparambu Maheswaran Namboodiri, were also present at the scene. Only those elephants certified by the veterinarians participated in the race.




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Shepherd Helps Police Recover Stolen Icons
Posted on 2002/2/24 22:46:02 ( 658 reads )


Source: The Hindu





TIRUNELVELI, INDIA, February 23, 2002: A tip-off given by a shepherd helped the police recover eight panchaloha (made of five metals) icons worth thousands of dollars, which were stolen from two ancient temples near here in the last two months. The DIG of Police, T. Rajendran, said that some unidentified miscreants took away four icons from the over four-century old Venkatesa Perumal Temple at Naranammalpuram about eight kilometers from here. On January 20, five icons were stolen from the Venkatachalapathi Temple at Narasinganallur. Karisoozhnthan, 13-year-old shepherd boy while grazing cattle near Tenkalam on Friday, spotted some shining objects beneath heaps of rejected limestones. A police party combed the area with the help of a sniffer dog and retrieved seven more icons from the heaps of limestones. The icon of Vishwat Thevar stolen from the Narasinganallur temple is yet to be retrieved.




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Magazine on Hindus Released in Trinidad and Tobago
Posted on 2002/2/24 22:45:02 ( 586 reads )


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TRINIDAD, February 23, 2002: Hindus comprise the second largest religious group in Trinidad and Tobago after Roman Catholics. Most Indians are Hindus, and Indians form just over half of the population (a total of 1.3 million) of the tiny Caribbean island. The Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council announces the publication and sale of its latest souvenir magazine, "Divali November, 2001, in Trinidad and Tobago." The theme of the magazine is the need for dialogue. It carries an interview with V.S.Naipal, the winner of the 2001 Noble Prize for Literature. There are insights into the lives of Hindus in Trinidad, political columns, and short stories within its 44 pages. Postal address for further information is Indo-Caribbean Cultural Council Swami Avenue, Don Miguel Road San Juan, Trinidad and Tobago West Indies or e-mail "source" above.




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Author Seeks Authorities on Globalization From the Hindu Perspective
Posted on 2002/2/24 22:44:02 ( 660 reads )


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USA, February 25, 2002: Noted religion author and editor Ira Rifkin is seeking Hindus who have written and spoken extensively about economic and cultural globalization for inclusion in his forthcoming book on religious attitudes toward globalization and how globalization has impacted religion. The book is intended as a general introduction to the subject for readers with a religious/spiritual perspective, or having an interest in that perspective. Nine or more traditions, including Hinduism, will be surveyed. Separate chapters will be devoted to each of the traditions. Activists, theologians, academics, religious/spiritual leaders and others from the pro- and anti-globalization camps are sought. Ira writes, "I'm looking for Hindus who can articulate the views toward economic and cultural globalism that are dominant in the Hindu world. I'm also interested in how Hinduism as a religion has been changed by globalism, and how Hindus, long members of a global religious/ethnic/national culture, cope with the rootlessness that accompanies globalization." HPI readers are invited to e-mail him at "source" above with their recommendation, including contact information. Because the book is being written for a North American audience, it would be best if those recommended lived in North America.




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