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Corporal Punishment On Wane In Arkansas Schools
Posted on 2001/2/12 22:47:02 ( 761 reads )


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SPRINGDALE, ARKANSAS, USA, February 11, 2001: Jim Lewis got his share of "licks" with a paddle when he was a student in public school. Now that he's a principal himself, he paddles students only on rare occasions and as a last resort. "Most principals now are far from the disciplinarians that principals used to be," said Lewis, principal at George Elementary in Springdale. He uses his wooden paddle about four times a school year and only with parents' consent. The principal was reluctant even to talk about paddling, since it's such a small a part of what goes on in his school. "It's not who I am," he said. Instead of giving licks, Lewis likes to work with the child and his parents on behavior changes when discipline problems arise. "Paddlings and spankings are usually short-term fixes," he said. Arkansas is one of 23 states in America that still allow corporal punishment in its public schools. Twenty-seven states have now banned the practice, up from five states in 1986. The Arkansas Board of Education adopted a resolution in 1993 urging school districts to pass policies against corporal punishment, saying such punishment wasn't in line with national education goals. Jim Argue, a Democratic representative for Little Rock, said "It represents a rural, male-dominated culture that sees corporal punishment as an acceptable tool of discipline." Argue said he's in the minority as a lawmaker against the practice. He decided to stop spanking his own children after punishing his young daughter one day. His daughter wondered aloud why he would hit her as punishment for hitting her sister. The irony struck him. "She kind of taught me a lesson," he said. "I don't think violence is a good tool [to encourage] nonviolence." "We discourage it," said Hartzell Jones, deputy superintendent for personnel in the Springdale School District. "But some people don't think a good spanking is child abuse. They think the Bible supports that." Many education groups and professional psychiatric and psychology taken the position that corporal punishment perpetuates a cycle of abuse.




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Ganja Trade Keeps Tribals On A High
Posted on 2001/2/11 22:49:02 ( 768 reads )


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PALAKKAD, INDIA, February 6, 2001: You can't miss the sign, "Sale, purchase or possession of all intoxicants is punishable." A reminder of good intentions gone awry. For the air in Attapadi, the largest tribal block in South India, is full of the scent of poppy, ganja and hooch, a trade the locals have perfected. The Karumber, the wealthiest of the tribals that include the Irullar, Mudugar and Valayars, no longer rely on government support to get by. Their thriving ganja (marijuana) cultivation in the thick forest takes care of all their needs. Despite the unlawful trade, the tribals continue to live in huts, away from civilization. It is outsiders who pocket the profits. They provide all the raw materials then return for the goods at harvest time. The tribals get a fixed commission, but even this small profit that trickles down is enough. The ganja brings in US$21.74 a kilo. (In the USA, a kilo could bring $2,150, not to mention eight years in jail and a $10,000 fine.) A plant matures in six months and in three years a maximum of 20 kg of leaves can be picked, bringing around $434.78 from one plant. The profits are mostly spent on liquor. Ironically, the main suppliers of hooch -- cheap liquor -- are the outsiders who trade in ganja. They ensure a continuing supply to the tribals.




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Diversity And Tolerance Thrive In This British City
Posted on 2001/2/11 22:48:02 ( 787 reads )


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LEICESTER, ENGLAND, February 2, 2001: Government figures have just projected that Leicester will become, in a decade, the first British city with a nonwhite majority. Instead of experiencing the cultural antagonisms and anti-immigrant politics that have occurred elsewhere in Britain and in Europe, where once all- white populations have increasing numbers of immigrants in their midst, the outcome here has been different. "Leicester defines itself as the tolerant, multicultural city of Europe," said Richard Bonney, priest and professor. "There is greater diversity in two or three square blocks here than anywhere I can think of in Europe," he added. Leicester was already a migrant's goal a century ago, drawing people from Ireland, Scotland, Wales and elsewhere in England. However, in the early 1970's when East African countries in the Commonwealth moved to evict their large Asian populations, the Leicester City Council placed an advertisement in the Ugandan Argus newspaper warning that housing, education and social services were "already stretched to the limit," and discouraged them from coming to Leicester. Many people who came from Kenya and Uganda had already experienced being immigrants and learning to adapt. In addition, they came in settled family groups. They were skilled and educated with goals of economic independence and social success. These new arrivals created employment and services and a retail, wholesale and real estate economy of their own. This lengthy article discusses further: Leicester history, Asian immigrant success and the lack of success for many Afro-Caribbeans.




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Quake Reveals Hidden Water
Posted on 2001/2/11 22:47:02 ( 717 reads )


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GUJARAT, INDIA, February 12, 2001: A body of fresh water discovered in the western state of Gujarat may be an ancient branch of Pakistan's famous Indus river. Recent satellite images taken above the epicenter of last month's earthquake, in the Rann (literally, "salt desert") of Kutch region, have uncovered the underground water channels in a barren area of the state known for its high salinity. A leading Indian scientist, Janardhan Negi, said the region had once been a delta for two famed, ancient rivers and that if field tests prove that the water seen in the satellite images is more than 200 years old, it could confirm that a branch of the Indus still flows in India. He said the Indus used to flow through the region until 1819, when a large earthquake -- equal in intensity to the one last month -- led to the river changing its course.




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"Yogi" Trademarked For Wall Street Journal Search System
Posted on 2001/2/10 22:49:02 ( 727 reads )


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NEW YORK, NEW YORK, February 6, 2001: America's business and commodities bible, the Wall Street Journal, in a move to capture attention to it's new software, has incorporated and trademarked the word "yogi" in the name "PurpleYogi Discovery Systems." The word popularly translates into one who has an evolved mystical knowledge. The Purple Yogi software claims to understand information anywhere in the Internet by classifying documents into a rich directory of concepts using proprietary advances in artificial intelligence, machine learning, and information theory. The WSJ promises that "no matter how you manage your information today, PurpleYogi Discovery Systems will unlock the full value of your business information, knowledge and intellectual assets." Such a trademark only prevents someone else from calling a similar product by the same name.




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Hindu Priests Chant For The Dead Of India's Quake
Posted on 2001/2/10 22:48:02 ( 778 reads )


Source: The Associated Press





BHUJ, INDIA, February 7, 2001: In front of an altar fashioned from shipping crates, Hindu priests prayed for the victims of India's quake Wednesday, chanting Sanskrit verses and name after name into the dusty air, remembering those killed by the worst earthquake to hit India in 50 years. The prayer organizers, followers of the Gujarati saint, Lord Swaminarayan, used newspaper ads to encourage residents to phone in the names of the dead so that they could be read at the daylong service. Since many are not sure when their relatives died -- or have even managed to recover a body for cremation -- the priests decided to hold the service Wednesday for all the dead, said Sadhu Brahmaviharidas. The prayers will end the traditional mourning period observed by the survivors and help people move on with recovery efforts, Brahmaviharidas said. "After the 12th day, the soul goes on to the next life," he explained.




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Villagers Resolve Not To Sin
Posted on 2001/2/10 22:47:02 ( 749 reads )


Source: Deccan Chronicle





DHORI, INDIA, February 4, 2001: Thousands of villagers in quake-stricken Gujarat vowed to lead a more reverent life after local priests declared that the Earth, revered as Mother Goddess, had roared and shuddered under the weight of sin. After the January 26 earthquake, villagers believe they have to be more religious to avoid future disasters. Local priests said the quake was provoked by rampant corruption, rising immorality and neglect of religion. "Bad deeds are blacker than mascara and sins are heavier than the earth," said priest Gosai Haripur. "Why else would our mother cause such destruction?" he asked. The quake devested Dhori, but struck at a time when most of the villagers were in the fields. Only 10 of its inhabitants died. Villagers said they never faced hunger and disease because people had decided to be good to each other since the disaster. People with cows are giving away milk free and those with fields are distributing food.




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Quake Can't Shake Caste System, Claim Catholics
Posted on 2001/2/10 22:46:02 ( 713 reads )


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LAKHOND, INDIA, February 8, 2001: Even though streets are strewn with rubble and houses are useless heaps of stone, one structure that can't be shaken in India, even by a killer earthquake is the caste system, according to this report in the Indian Express. The town has six distinct tent camps for the earthquake homeless - four different Hindu castes, the untouchables and Muslims. All the camps are separate. Relief groups find themselves wrestling with the country's ingrained social hierarchy to get help to everybody. "The whole issue of making sure all the castes are included has been a challenge,'' Graham Saunders of Catholic Relief Services said. "Whatever the distribution of aid, it first goes to the upper castes,'' claimed Mayuri Mistry, a Catholic Relief Services worker in Gujarat. Other reports, however, indicate that villages are working in excellent cooperation across both caste and religious lines.




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Youth Request Swami's Lessons in School
Posted on 2001/2/10 22:45:02 ( 833 reads )


Source: Deccan Chronicle





HYDERABAD, INDIA, February 4, 2001: Over 1,263 youth belonging to an organization called the Andhra Pradesh Yuvajana Sanghala Samithi have presented a proposal to the government requesting that Swami Vivekananda's lessons be included in their school curriculum. Maintaining that the lessons will promote leadership qualities, the members of the samithi have submitted a signature list and a memorandum to Chief Minister N. Chandra Naidu.




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Antiseptic in Toothpaste Kills Malaria Parasite
Posted on 2001/2/10 22:44:02 ( 937 reads )


Source: Times of India





HYDERABAD, INDIA, February 6, 2001: Two Indian scientists, a husband and wife team, discovered that the antiseptic triclosan used in toothpaste kills the parasite responsible for causing malaria. Namita and Avadesha Surolia's finding has been confirmed by both British and American researchers. Malaria remains one of the leading causes of death by disease in the world.




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Krishna Temple Suffered Quake Damage
Posted on 2001/2/9 22:49:02 ( 726 reads )


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JAMNAGAR, INDIA, February 7, 2001: The 5,000-year-old temple at Dwarka in honor of Lord Krishna suffered grave damage as a result of the January 26 earthquake in Gujarat. The Archaeological Survey of India is expected to organize repairs to the temple so that it can be rendered safe for pilgrims. Previous to this natural disaster Lord Krishna's home received around 7,000 pilgrims daily. Stones have fallen and cracks have appeared throughout the structure. Now only locals venture to the temple.




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South India's Kumbha Mela Held at Mysore
Posted on 2001/2/9 22:48:02 ( 794 reads )


Source: The Hindu





MYSORE, INDIA, February 4, 2001: With the approaching Maha Sivaratri celebrations, the Kumbha Mela at Allahabad where millions have taken a purifying dip will soon end. Devout Hindus are now focused on a three-day Mela from February 6-8 in Mysore District at Tirumakudala Narsipura. This site, where three sacred rivers also join, has gained significance since 1989. When the Swamjis of Kailas Ashrama Mahasamsthana Math, Adichunchanagiri Math, Suttur Math and Omkarashrama Mahasamsthana Mathi in the region realized that sages Agastya, Gargamuni and Markandeya had worshiped and done penance at the confluence, the Mela at T. Narsipura has been well attended, especially by those who can't make it to the mela in the north.




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Kanchi Sankaracharya Limits Agni Hotra Practice
Posted on 2001/2/9 22:47:02 ( 816 reads )


Source: Hinduism Today Press Release





KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA, February 10, 2001: On receiving complaints from the public and religious organizations regarding the wrong practice of "agni hotra," the Malaysia Hindu Sangam wrote to the Sankaracharya of Kanchi Peetham in Tamil Nadu, South India for advice. His Holiness, Sri Jayendra Saraswati, replied, "Agni hotra should not be done by everybody. There are lots of achara anusthana, rules and regulations. If everybody does it as they like, it will end up with ill effects. Therefore, the Hindu Sangam should make an effort to stop it". A copy of the letter from Sri Jayendra was published by Sangam president A.Vaithilingam. The Sangam's Hindu Religious Advisory Council advised the public that only those who are well versed with the knowledge of the rules and regulations and who have their guru's initiation should do the agni hotra. A simplified version of the agni hotra, or fire worship ceremony, has been promoted in Malaysia and other parts of the world in recent years as something which could be done by anyone, regardless of training or initiation.




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Corporal Punishment Goes On Despite Ban
Posted on 2001/2/9 22:46:02 ( 810 reads )


Source: Hindustan Times





New Delhi, February 2, 2001: Though it has been two months since corporal punishment was banned by the Delhi Court, some teachers and parents still hold to the adage, "spare the rod and spoil the child." According to a study by psychiatrists Dr. Samir Parikh and Geeta Kapoor, 80 percent of the 1,000 public school students surveyed reveal that the teachers still resort to "physical or severe punishment." Only one out of ten schools has a counselor on their rolls even though it is now compulsory. Counselors not only help the child with academic related anxiety but also personal problems. Dr. Parikh believes that corporal punishment may lead to psychiatric illnesses like obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It increases the tendency for aggressiveness and violent behavior. In children approaching adolescence the sexual instincts are more pronounced, which might lead to an increased tendency toward aggressiveness and violence if aggravated through physical punishment. One also needs to take a sympathetic look at teachers who are put under great pressure to produce high grades. "Whether we like it or not, the quality of teachers as well as parenting has gone down," adds Dr. Parikh.




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Smoking In Public Taboo
Posted on 2001/2/9 22:45:02 ( 780 reads )


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NEW DELHI, INDIA, Feb. 6, 2001: A comprehensive legislation by the Union Cabinet today decided to curb smoking in public places. It would also seek to ban sale of tobacco products to minors under the age of 18 and to ban sponsorship of sports and cultural events by tobacco-product companies. The Union Minister and Cabinet spokesperson, Mr. Pramod Mahajan, said the legislation would ensure that warnings on the package would be of the same size as that of the largest panel of the package, with warnings in both English and the local language of the territory where it was sold. Smoking in public places and sale to minors would attract a fine up to US$2.17. For other convictions, the punishment proposed was imprisonment up to three years and fine up to $2,174. It was estimated that India accounts for one-third of the three million deaths which occurred around the world every year due to tobacco-related ailments.




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