Magazine Links
What Is Hinduism?
Join the Conversation
Translate This Page
Hindu Press International
« 1 ... 884 885 886 (887) 888 889 890 ... 904 »
New Breed of Yoga
Posted on 2001/1/17 22:47:02 ( 802 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





NEW YORK, NEW YORK, January 7, 2001: In this recent article in the New York Times, Ilene Rosenzweig notes the rapid changes taking place in yoga classes. Once associated with hippies and granola, yoga classes are now packed with students and are held in state-of-the art yoga centers. A new yoga generation has come up over the last few years as yoga studios pop up everywhere. Even fitness clubs are offering an increasingly sophisticated variety of classes as yoga outpaces the previous mainstays like spinning and step aerobics. The average New York yoga student has achieved a high level of proficiency in the physical practices and the spiritual teachings, claims Rosenzweig, creating a super breed of yogis with a command of Sanskrit lingo and expert pretzel poses. Classes often begin with ancient Hindu chants and you may even see an altar to Siva set up in the corner. Some teachers put in long hours studying yoga philosophy and Hindu texts to keep up with the level of their students knowledge. Clad in the latest yoga fashions and sporting trendy equipment they give a new image to an ancient Indian discipline. Madonna and other stars claiming yoga as their primary fitness regimen are living billboards of the sinewy, muscled "yoga body" that has become a new ideal.




No comment
Reader Takes Exception to Hinduism Today Article on Guyana/Suriname
Posted on 2001/1/17 22:46:02 ( 870 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





KAPAA, HAWAII, January 10, 2001: Hinduism Today felt HPI readers would be interested in the long letter on our article on Guyana/Suriname which appeared in the January/February, 2001, issue.

Dear Editor, Articles on the Indian Diaspora are certainly welcome, especially those that document the continuation of our Indian Culture and the efforts to propagate it. That is why the feature article by Anil Mahabir, titled "Hindus of South America," in the January/February 2001 issue of your esteem magazine is crucially important -- not for its ostentatious portrayal of the tribulations of our ancient culture, but because it does that culture an injustice. This flagrant misrepresentation aside, Mr. Mahabir's article is also a flagrant violation of part of the raison d'etre of Hinduism Today as it contravenes purposes [3] and [5]. The former, for example, states that one of the functions of your magazine is "To dispel myths, illusions and misinformation about Hinduism." This is why I feel compelled to respond to Mr. Mahabir's article. First, the article is riddled with factual errors. Here are some glaring examples:

* "I traveled 45 miles by speedboat from one bank of the Essequibo River to the next " (p. 18). As far as I know, the normal route that speedboats ply, from Parika to Supernaam, takes about 45 minutes and is no more that 10 miles. The routes plied less often, from Parika to Wakenaam and Parika to Leguan, take less time because the distances involved are shorter.

* "The Ramayana is the main text" (p. 18). This is essentially a regurgitation of historical studies that document the indenture experience. Today, at least in my native Essequibo, it is Bhagavad Gita that is the main text of Sanatana Dharma, not the Ramayana.

* I fail to understand how the similarities between Guyanese and Trinidadian Hindus have been "shaped by a shared Caribbean experience." Our Shastras and nothing else have shaped Indian culture, which has remained basically unchanged for the last 6,000 and more years, despite the prolonged shocks imparted to it by Islam and Christianity. I maintain that the core of Caribbean Hindu culture survived the indenture experience intact.

* "Pundit Reepu Persaud pointed out that these [the Indians who arrived in Guyana on May 5, 1838] were the first to bring Hinduism to the Americas, not Swami Vivekananda." This is a silly statement that lacks any deep thinking, something that is sorely absent among Caribbean Hindus. The first Indians who came to Guyana (and thus the Americas) merely relocated geographically; they did not transmit Hinduism to the people they found there. On the other hand, it was no other than Swami Vivekananda who opened the Western mind to Hinduism; it was Swamiji who sanitized Hinduism of the heathen aspects that various European and others arbitrarily pasted upon it.

* "Perhaps about 10 percent [of the Indians who came] returned to Indian from Guyana." For the record, about 240,000 Indians came to Guyana and about 76,000 returned (among other sources, see Dwarka Nath, 1970. A History of Indians in Guyana. London: Butler and Tanner). That is, about 32 per cent of those Indians who came to Guyana returned to their native Bharat.

* "It is believed the ratio of migrants was 100 men to 20 women " (p. 21). This is a downright fabrication. Indeed, the sex gap was too large for a self-sustaining Indian population, but, once again, Mr. Mahabir did not do his research. The evidence shows that,

No comment
The Story Of Kumbh Mela
Posted on 2001/1/14 22:49:02 ( 869 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





ALLAHABAD, INDIA: Periodical fairs or Melas are held by Hindus to honor of Gods or Goddesses. The most important of these is the Kumbha Mela which may have originated as a meeting place for the main religious heads who could lay down canons for the whole community as Hinduism has no supreme hierarchical head. A large number of saints and sages attend and it is the prospect of their blessing that draws the crowds. The material on this web site offers a comprehensive overview of the history and mythology of the Mela.




No comment
Study: Cutting TV Reduces Aggression
Posted on 2001/1/14 22:48:02 ( 729 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, January 14, 2001: A school-based program that discourages television and video game use makes grade-school children less aggressive, a Stanford University study suggests. While previous research has linked exposure to media violence with increased aggression, few potential solutions have been evaluated, the authors said. Their findings indicate "that the effects of televised violence in kids are really reversible," said Dr. Thomas Robinson, the lead author and an assistant professor of pediatrics.




No comment
Less Donations From Churchgoers To Churches
Posted on 2001/1/14 22:47:02 ( 754 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





CHAMPAIGN, ILLINOIS, January 9, 2001: Churchgoers are donating an increasingly smaller share of their incomes. The percentage of income Protestant Christians give fell from 3.1% in 1968 to 2.5% in 1998, according to Empty Tomb, a research group in Champaign, Illinois. That means church members gave $4 billion less in 1998 than they would have if they were giving at the same rate they did in 1968. Total annual contributions rose by an average of $202 to $570 per church member, after inflation was taken into account, because incomes also rose. Most of the money is being spent on salaries, in-church programs, and building-maintenance rather than on outreach efforts such as missions and services for the poor. The report said that if U.S. church members had tithed, or given 10 percent of after-tax income in 1998, churches would have had an additional $131 billion.




No comment
Prime Minister Keen To Bathe at Kumbha Mela
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:49:02 ( 738 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





NEW DELHI, INDIA, January 14, 2001: Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee is apparently keen, along with tens of millions of Hindu pilgrims at the Maha Kumbh Mela now on in Allahabad, to immerse himself in purificatory waters. Official sources say the Special Protection Group responsible for Vajpayee's security is less than enthusiastic given the enormous logistical problems. The PM reportedly wants to participate in the most auspicious day -- January 24 -- when as many as 30 million people are expected to take a purificatory dip at the spot where the holy Ganges and Yamuna rivers converge near the town of Allahabad.




No comment
Dalai Lama Invited to Kumbha Mela
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:48:02 ( 833 reads )


Source: Reuters





DHARMASALA, INDIA, January 11, 2001: The Dalai Lama is considering a request from the Vishwa Hindu Parishad, to attend a Hindu religious festival in India, an official of the Tibetan leader's government-in-exile announced. The Dalai Lama has accepted "in principle" the invitation, according to both a member of his office in New Delhi and a high-ranking member of the Hindu Council. But he still must obtain permission from Indian officials before he can attend, the Tibetan Authority has said.




No comment
Oriya Community Objects to ISKCON Rath Yatra
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:47:02 ( 772 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





BOMBAY, INDIA, January 8, 2001: Traditionalists of the Oriya community in Bombay who worship Lord Jagannath at the Puri temple, have vocalized their disapproval of recent ISKCON activities. Deities from the temple were paraded in chariots amidst cheering and dancing for the second time in the year 2000. Protesting that ISKCON devotees lack respect for the culture that dictates a rath yatra can only take place once a year, the community has also objected that deviation from tradition looks bad to the outside world.




No comment
Tibetans Flee Homeland to Preserve Religious Freedom
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:46:02 ( 738 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





TIBET, CHINA, January 8, 2001: Fleeing their homeland to preserve their religious freedom due to Chinese government repression, Tibetan Clergy, women and children are seeking peace in new lands. The oppressive environment advocated by the government includes such atrocities as illegal raids on houses to destroy religious altars, forced sterilization of women, lack of educational opportunities for Tibetan youth and unfounded arrests. As a result, the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy has reported that over 2,660 Tibetans fled into exile in the year 2000.




No comment
Record Number of Pilgrims Visit Vaishno Devi
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:45:02 ( 743 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





JAMMU, INDIA, January 7, 2001: In the year 2000, an additional 547,0000 pilgrims were able to partake in the darshan at the holy cave shrine of Vaishno Devi. The Chief Executive Officer of the Devi Shrine board attributes the increase to religious devotion as well as more amiable accommodations available for devotees.




No comment
Genetically Modified Foods get Approval
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:44:02 ( 779 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





NEW DELHI, INDIA, January 8, 2001: Hopeful of eradicating or reducing poverty, hunger and malnutrition in India by the year 2020, the 88th Indian Science Congress has approved the production of genetically modified (GM) foods. In conjunction with protecting the environment and the rich bio-diversity of India, the technology will be tested in laboratories before reaching the fields. International biotech companies are fervently working to get a free hand for GM plants in India, as Western countries, especially in Europe, severely restrict the research. The "Vitamin A" rice, for example, cannot be tested on humans in Europe and a scheme is underway to have it tested on malnourished Indian villagers.




No comment
Kashmir Shiva Temples May Crumble
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:43:02 ( 833 reads )


Source: Asian Age





JAMMU & KASHMIR, INDIA, January 7, 2001: 2000-year-old temples dedicated to Lord Siva are about to crumble with neglect unless the Archaeological Survey of India steps in. Due to unstable government in the state, restoration has been abandoned. The Naranag temples were built with megaliths, huge undressed stones, that were placed with precision. The result was geometrically correct and artistically pleasing places of worship. They are located 65 miles north of Srinagar and are presently being used as camps for militants in the area.




No comment
Hard Line Rulers Oppose Conversion
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:42:02 ( 847 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





KABUL, AFGHANISTAN January 8, 2001: Hard line Taliban rulers who enforce strict Islamic law in Afghanistan have announced that the death penalty will be imposed on Muslims converting to another religion. Similarly anyone trying to convert a Muslim will experience the same fate. However, followers of other religions are allowed to practice their faith without being ostracized. What is left of once-large Sikh and Hindu community reportedly worship regularly at gurudwaras and temples in the capital of Kabul.




No comment
Ban on Plastics
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:41:02 ( 787 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





GOA, INDIA, January 9, 2001: Backed by the Goa Environment Federation and the Local Authorities, the Goa government has banned the use of plastics in the state starting in May 2001. Plastic can be neither burnt nor buried resulting in a problem for the product's proper disposal. Citizens are supporting the Chief Minister's progressive decision. An special problem is consumption by cows of plastic bags.




No comment
Employed Rather than Retired Over Age 65
Posted on 2001/1/13 22:40:02 ( 986 reads )


GO TO SOURCE





The Census Bureau of the United States predicts that by the year 2030 one in four US citizens will be over 65 years of age. Out of necessity and with good health, this multi-talented age group will be visibly present in the work force. This entertaining New York Times report covers hardworking old folks in their 80s, 90s and even 100s, including one who continues to operate heavy equipment at a quarry. In 1900 there were only 63,000 centenarians. Halfway through the 21st century, this number is expected to reach 834,000.




No comment
« 1 ... 884 885 886 (887) 888 889 890 ... 904 »

Search Our Site

Loading