Birmingham Loves Ramayana

Date 2000/12/6 22:48:02 | Topic: Hindu Press International


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BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND, October 26, 2000: Epics are everywhere. Theatre critic Micheal Billington was captivated by a new version of the legendary Sanskrit saga, the "Ramayana," adapted by Peter Oswald and produced by Indhu Rubasingham, hailing it "witty and inventive" delighting the large, multiracial audience. He wrote, "What struck me was its blend of the spiritual and the secular. It is an adventure story, but the basic themes are universal: sacrifice, fidelity, sexual and fraternal love, the conflict of good and evil. What is impressive about Oswald's version is the way it captures both the story's Hindu origins and its cross-cultural appeal. If the narrative leaps lightly over East-West barriers so, too, does Rubasingham's production, which is characterized by its merry eclecticism. In an age of parsimony it is also astonishing to see 21 actors and two musicians on stage. From a vast company, I would single out Gerald Kyd as a stately, turquoise Rama, Andrew French as the rapacious Ravana, Miltos Yerolemou as a hairy, Pan-like Lord Hanuman and Charlotte Bicknell, who has a remarkable capacity to stay in character while dangling upside down from a rope. Erratic lighting aside, this is a totally charming show that gives us access to an Indian classic and combines uplifting spiritual odyssey with old-fashioned magic."







This article comes from Hinduism Today Magazine
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