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Published: 2008/2/22 6:32:25
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(Correspondents Continued)

Mangala Prasad Mohanty, born in a devout family in the village Batagaon, near Puri town, lives with his wife and son in Delhi. A seasoned journalist, published throughout India, he speaks on All India Radio, and translates poetic works into English and Oriya. In Puri he has registered a Non-Governmental Organization(NGO) called Society for Environmental Action and Restoration of Cultural Heritage (search). He shares, "The world is full of hunger, disease, poverty, violence and hatred, and the worst crime, that perpetrated in the name of caste, religion and creed. But I believe in Divinity and Grace. I strongly advocate that by positive thinking and action, the world would turn better, positive, a place worth living in peace and prosperity. I believe in the ancient Hindu philosophy, vasudhaiva kutumbakam ('the world is one family'). I adore diversity, love, peace and Hinduism. Since childhood I was fond of visiting temples and meeting saints. The same old habit made it possible for me to meet Sri Gurudeva, founder of Hinduism Today. Little did I know that meeting would lead to a lifetime affair in creativity and spirituality. My lifestyle has undergone tremendous change. I am more compassionate, peaceful, calm and devoted to what I do. I have greater respect towards elders, brahmins, saints and priests. I take an active role in the promotion of our value system and morality. Attaining moksha, liberation, remains the sacred and ultimate goal in life."

Prabha Prabhakar Bhardwaj is a free-lance journalist living with her husband in Kenya. She grew up in Jammu, North India. She left a Masters in economics to get married, 16 years later earned a Bachelors Degree in Journalism in Hyderabad, then moved to Kenya to teach journalism at Nairobi University. She specializes in environment and gender issues and has published many books, among them, Body and Mind, Women and Environment, translated into Spanish, French and English. Prabha was a key member in writing two environmental action plans, one for the Kenyan government and one for the UN. Her contributions to Hinduism Today include: Kenya Temple Moves (9-94), Kenya's Hindu Kids (9-94), Kashmir Pandits (11-94), Hindus Return to Uganda (12-94), The Ganesha Milk Miracle (12-95), Hindus in West Africa and Dressing for Heaven (3-97). In her vision, Prabha Prabhakar is deeply concerned for the future of Hinduism: "I have seen five generations in my own family, from my grandparents to my grand-daughter, and Hinduism is successively getting more diluted with each generation. Hinduism Today has the capability to attract the younger generation in a very pragmatic and rational manner. I plan to reach out to the Hindu youth of today and future generations scattered around the world by coming down to their level. I am researching Hindu rituals from birth to death for a book on that subject to attract the young to our traditional religion. There should also be emphasis on caring for elders so that they are not neglected in their late years, an unfortunate modern trend."

                                  ;                                 & nbsp;                                 ;Continued on the next page.

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