Hindu Press International


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Official Well-Being Statistics Show Religious People Are Happier than Atheists

Posted on 2016/2/5 18:11:10 ( 266 reads )

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UNITED KINGDOM, February 2, 2016 (Huffington Post): Religious people from all different faiths are happier than those who have "no religion," official data released on Tuesday revealed. Of all the faiths in the UK, Hindus are the happiest, scoring well above the national average and just under the demographic of people who consider themselves to be "in very good health," according to data compiled by the Office for National Statistics.

On average, Hindus scored a rating of 7.57 (out of 10) for happiness, followed by Christians at 7.47, Sikhs with 7.45 and Buddhist at 7.41. Those who follow "any other religion" came in at 7.26. And people who belonged to "no religion" were the unhappiest, scoring just 7.22.

The ONS report analysed personal well-being data for more than 300,000 adults in the UK. The samples were collected over three years, between 2012 and 2015.

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Ramakrishnan Professorship to Support Study of Sanskrit

Posted on 2016/2/5 18:10:59 ( 270 reads )

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CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, January 26, 2016 (University of Chicago): As the University of Chicago prepares to celebrate two major anniversaries in South Asian studies, a new gift will help to ensure UChicago's continued leadership in the study of the Indian subcontinent. The Anupama and Guru Ramakrishnan Professorship in Sanskrit Studies, established by a US$3.5 million gift from Guru and Anupama Ramakrishnan, supports a faculty member whose work focuses on the ancient classical language. Gary Tubb, professor in South Asian Languages and Civilizations and faculty director of the University of Chicago Center in Delhi, will be the first scholar to hold the new position.

Sanskrit is the language of the scriptures of the Hindu religion, as well as much of the literature of the Jains and Buddhists. In addition, many important works of poetry, philosophy, science, history, law, political theory, medicine and aesthetics were written in Sanskrit, the oldest literary language of South Asia. Sanskrit is also the longest continuously taught South Asian language at UChicago, having been offered since the first classes were held at the University in 1892.

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Daily Inspiration

Posted on 2016/2/5 18:10:48 ( 191 reads )

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A person's growth begins with dissatisfaction. Not content with the world, he seeks satisfaction by prayers to God; this purifies his mind and he longs to know God more than to satisfy his carnal desires. Then God's grace begins to manifest. God will take the form of a guru and appear to the devotee, to teach him Truth so that his mind gains strength and is able to turn inward. With meditation the mind is purified yet further, and eventually remains still without the least ripple. That stillness is the Self. The guru is both exterior and interior: from the exterior he gives a push to the mind to turn inward and from the interior he pulls the mind towards the Self. That is grace. See? There is no difference between God, guru and Self.
-- Ramana Maharishi (1879-1950), South Indian mystic

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How India Forgot About Pakistani Hindus

Posted on 2016/2/4 18:06:04 ( 579 reads )

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PAKISTAN, February 1. 2016 (by David Frawley): Which religious group has the least amount of human rights in South Asia? The probable answer, perhaps surprisingly, is a group that few think about or recognize as existing - Pakistani Hindus. The plight of Pakistani Hindus is among the direst of any community in the world and has been so for decades. Yet not many in the world are aware of, much less have any concern for them, even in India. Hindus in Pakistan are a targeted community and losing their numbers, unlike Muslims in India who are increasing. While there were similar percentages of Hindus in Pakistan and Muslims in India at the time of Partition, Pakistani Hindus have been continually oppressed, marginalized, converted or simply eliminated. The result is that only two per cent of Pakistan is Hindu today.

Pakistani Hindus are among the poorest of the poor and do only the most menial jobs. The most basic human rights are not given to them. Pakistani Hindus cannot own land or register their marriages. Their women are commonly abducted and there is little they can do about it. Pakistani courts seldom hear their pleas, or if they do, seldom rule in their favor. You will not see any thriving Hindu temples left in Pakistan comparable to the great mosques that have continued in India. Hindu temples are neglected, occupied or destroyed. There are no Hindu religious schools of any size or any group funding them like the Saudi-funded madrasas in India. There are no government honored Hindu holidays in Pakistan, such as Islamic holidays in India.

Should not all groups in India insist that Pakistani Hindus be afforded the same rights as Indian Muslims? After all, they are both human beings. Fortunately, the Narendra Modi government is beginning to address the plight of Pakistani Hindus and a few India media groups are making better efforts as well. Yet so far they are only scraping the tip of a massive iceberg of oppression and abuse that will require persistent and determined struggles to effectively correct.

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Shun Colonised Mindset to Conserve Sanskrit: Najma Heptulla

Posted on 2016/2/4 18:05:53 ( 537 reads )

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NEW DELHI, INDIA, February 2, 2016 (Press Trust of India): Sanskrit would have survived had it become the language of commoners, Union minister Najma Heptulla noted here today while asking people to shun their "colonized" mindset to conserve the country's oldest language. "Sanskrit would have survived had it been the language of commoners and not only elites. Colonization here (in India) also contributed (to the present condition of Sanskrit). We became colonized in our minds."

"We need to throw colonization out of our mind," she said. The Minority Affairs Minister made the remarks during launch of author Rajiv Malhotra's book "The Battle for Sanskrit," at Delhi University. Heptulla rued that Sanskrit, despite being the oldest Indian language, was not taken care of in the country, while other nations "distorted" it. She said presently only around 40,000 persons speak Sanskrit in the country.



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